The AA8V/W8EXI 6CL6 One-Tube Transmitter
by Greg Latta, AA8V

Dave Rogers' (WB4CHK) Version of the Transmitter

Front

6CL6 Transmitter Pages:
 6CL6 Home/Historical Background  Restoration Photos and Details
 Exterior Photos of the Finished Transmitter  Schematic Diagram and Circuit Description
 Interior Photos of the Finished Transmitter  Why Use A 6CL6?
 Photos of the Transmitter In Its Original Condition  Which Crystals to Use/Power Output
 Power Transformer Specifications  AA8V with Jim Trutko W8EXI
 Tune Up Procedure  Dave Rogers' (WB4CHK) Version of the Transmitter

In November of 2005 Dave Rogers (WB4CHK) finished building his 6CL6 transmitter and was kind enough to send me some photos. I thought it would be helpful to show how someone else put the transmitter together. If you have any questions for Dave, you can e-mail him at Davewb4@aol.com

Photos of Dave Rogers' (WB4CHK) Version of the 6CL6 Transmitter:
Front View:
In this front view of Dave's transmitter, you can see that his front panel layout is essentially the same as the original transmitter layout. The only difference is that Dave mounted the crystal socket horizontally, whereas it is mounted vertically in the original version of the transmitter. (Note: In this photo Dave has the plate tuning and loading control labels reversed. The one marked "plate tuning" should be marked "plate loading" and vice-versa.)
Front View
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Click here for a super detailed view.
Rear View:
This is the rear view of Dave's transmitter. The layout is similar, but not identical, to that of the original transmitter. You will notice that Dave chose to mount the power supply on a separate chassis, which gives you more room on the transmitter and makes the wiring easier. Dave also made good use of terminal strips for the power supply connections.

For the tank coil, Dave used 1 1/4" PVC pipe, and it looks like it worked great.. Dave made his transmitter for 40, 30, and 20 meters, so there are fewer turns of wire and fewer taps on the coil.

Another important difference is that Dave used a variable capacitor (on the right in the photo) for the loading capacitor, rather than switched, fixed, capacitors, as in the original. The variable capacitor is definitely the way to go! The large 18pf-500pf capacitor that Dave used (because that is what he had) will work fine, though it is not necessary. A smaller one would do nicely too. Any air variable capacitor with a maximum capacity of 200pf to 400pf should work fine as a loading capacitor.
Front View
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Click here for a super detailed view.
Power Supply:
Though Dave chose to use a separate chassis for the power supply, his component layout is very similar to that of the original transmitter. Keeping to tradition, Dave used a bread loaf pan for the chassis, a practice common in the 50's and 60's. At the left rear you can see the black terminal strip that Dave used to make connections to the power supply. The terminal strip is a great idea, as it allows the power supply to be easily used to power other vintage projects.
Front View
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Click here for a super detailed view.

Wingfoot Exciter PictureClick here for pictures and information on the Wingfoot VFO 2E26 Exciter

813 Amplifier PictureClick here for pictures and information on the Wingfoot 813 Amplifier


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